The view from the top of Marguerite Bourgeoys is definitely worth the climb; and, there are plenty of places to take breaks along the way to make the climb manageable for those who need to take it slow.

From the top you immediately see Quai de l’Horloge with the Plage de l’Horloge and the Sailors’ Memorial Clock (1919). Line ups for the clock start early in the morning… it takes a while to do the 192-step climb for the view.

Past the Quai de l’Horloge are the two Parc Jean-Drapeau islands. In 1965, as the city was building the Metro system, they used the 15-million tons of rock they excavated to create L’île Notre-Dame, the site of Expo ’67.

The second island is Île Sainte-Hélène, a historic island that once belonged to the Le Moyne family (1665-1818). Île Sainte-Hélène was historically smaller but expanded for Expo ’67.

South of Marguerite Bourgeoys is Old Montréal. The first stone chapel founded by Marguerite Bourgeoys in 1675 sat in this location as part of Montréal’s original waterfront landscape.