The oil tasting was followed by a wine tasting, during which I ate all the olives. I blame this on the Pedro Ximenez and not my addiction to olives (notice how the olives disappear as the photos progress). I’m pretty sure that I also polished off a large portion of the cheese and Iberian ham, but that’s a completely different story.

Earlier in the day, while exploring the olive mill, tucked away behind one of the large beams we found an area where grapes were crushed during wine making. It was here that we learned about stomping grapes during the making of wine, and how this was a community event. It wasn’t a large area, but big enough to make a decent number of bottles for the village.

Throughout the tasting I wasn’t a huge fan of the white wines; the Spanish versions seemed nice enough but even in the best of circumstances I’m not an avid white wine drinker. However, the reds that caught my attention. My favourite of all the wines was a sherry: Pedro Ximenez.

Sherry’s aren’t hugely popular or easy to find in North America, so whatever space was spared in my luggage by me not buying tons of olive oil, was quickly filled by Pedro Ximenez.